Rays News

Tampa Bay Rays: Strong pitching leads to series win

By Austin Reimann
ST PETERSBURG, FLORIDA - MARCH 28: Blake Snell #4 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws the first pitch of the season to George Springer #4 of the Houston Astros During Opening Day at Tropicana Field on March 28, 2019 in St Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images)
ST PETERSBURG, FLORIDA - MARCH 28: Blake Snell #4 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws the first pitch of the season to George Springer #4 of the Houston Astros During Opening Day at Tropicana Field on March 28, 2019 in St Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images) /
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ST. PETERSBURG, FL – MARCH 29: Starting pitcher Charlie Morton #50 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros at Tropicana Field on March 29, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)
ST. PETERSBURG, FL – MARCH 29: Starting pitcher Charlie Morton #50 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros at Tropicana Field on March 29, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images) /

Charlie Morton:

  • 5 IP, W
  • 2 ER
  • 8K/2BB

The Tampa Bay Rays paid the 35 year old right handed pitcher 30 million this offseason and he proved that the decision to be a solid one. Although it is only one start that lasted  just over 80 pitches, Morton was impressive.

In facing his old team, one that he secured a championship for, Morton struck out 8 former teammates while surrendering only 2 runs en route to his first win in a Rays uniform.

In what would be an emotional start for anyone in Morton’s place, the Bradenton native remained composed and began his Rays career with a solid start. The curveball was filthy along with his upper 90’s fastball.

Morton out-dueled fellow rotation mate Gerrit Cole in what was a battle of wills. Cole made one more mistake than Morton as he took the loss after throwing 6 innings, striking out 10 and allowing 4 runs, only one of those earned.

As Brian Smith of the Houston Chronicle said, “It was classic Morton. A moment when the game slowed down and it felt like the outing could slip way. A couple loaded counts. Then fastball power, nasty breaking pitches and more zeroes on the board.”

Hopefully we can get used to this “classic Morton”.

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